Tag Archive | "journalism"

Shruti R

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Alumni Interview with Shruthi R, News Presenter for Josh FM

Posted on 10 April 2013 by BMMBoxer

Introduction

My Name is:  Shruthi Rajendran

BMM College: Jai Hind College

BMM Specialisation: Journalism (Batch of 2010)

Currently Working at: Gulf News Broadcasting (UAE) – News Presenter for Josh FM

Shruti R

Shruti R

Shruti’s Take

Q. Does being a BMMite give you an edge over others in the field of media?

A. It certainly does. I did my Masters immediately after BMM and everything I learnt in theory while studying BMM helped me do the practical bit of the Masters. Even as I did odd freelance jobs as a student, I was still ahead of people who had done non-media related courses.

Q. Do the subjects in BMM help you know the reality of the job? Is there any place for theory in the creative world?

A. Learning the theory is what enables you to apply it in the practical world. BMM subjects aren’t like algebraic formulas where you’re almost certain you’re never going to use it. Simple things like even knowing the correct terms in TV and Radio helps when you go out there. Creativity is great but if you don’t have the discipline to channel it then it’s all just a waste.

Q. BMM or BMM from a particular college? Does it make a difference?

A. I’d like to think so. The brand name matters. But in the end it boils down to how much scope you have to express your ideas, how far you can think outside the box, and how much of it can you apply when you’re put in the situation. You need to learn the minute details for the exam but the facts that you retain which you can use in the real world makes the difference – irrespective of the college.

Q. Internships during colleges – are they relevant in the long run?

A. YES. Absolutely. No experience is irrelevant. Even something as silly as a local newsletter or a community radio is great experience because it shows you have some knowledge of the work. I know it is difficult to manage odd hours of BMM and internships but the vacations are a brilliant time to get whatever experience you can get your hands on.

Q. Work Experience or Higher Studies? What’s your pick? Why?

A. I chose the path of higher studies – as mentioned before – but I also worked while I was doing my MA. I used to help out at a local radio station in England with uploading content on their website from 6 am to 9 am then head off to Uni for my lectures at 10. It was something basic as content but it helped me make contacts, gave me the feel of working in an actual radio station, and even helped me build my skills as a reporter. But the education bit helped as well – it was easier to get work experience opportunities because I had mentioned I was doing my Masters. In the end getting a job was fairly simple – I had a world load of experience and a Masters degree in Broadcast Journalism.

Tips for BMMBoxers

BMM is… a great building block

Your favourite subjects in BMM: Editing – nothing has helped me more after I graduated

5 Must-Follow Tips for BMMites:

  • Experiment – it is the best time to try new things
  • Create a style or identity for yourself – make sure that style is reflected in everything you do. You will be instantly recognised
  • Learn as many softwares as you can while you’re doing your bachelors. People will be amazed
  • Have fun – once you get sucked into the adult life – as much fun as media is – you can not make mistakes as often and you will definitely be held responsible for them
  • If you have a certain field or specialisation that you’re particularly interested in – don’t give up until you get into that and don’t settle for the next best. You’ll end up doing the thing you started as part-time while you could pursue your dreams, for the rest of your life. Don’t give up

Current BMM students can connect with you on:

On twitter @ShruthiR11 or on email @shruthi.rg11@gmail.com

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capgown

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Post-Graduate Media Courses

Posted on 03 April 2013 by BMMBoxer

With TY exams on the anvil and with the rush of finding that perfect PG course to pursue, we understand how hard-pressed for time students are. In our bid to help, we have shortlisted a few PG media courses with all the necessary details. Take a look and you can thank us later! :D


Where: Jamia Millia’s A J Kidwai Mass Communication Research Centre (AJKMCRC)
What: M.A. in Mass Communication/M.A. in Convergent Journalism/M.A. in Development Communication/M.A. in Visual Effect and Animation/PG Diploma in Broadcast Technology/PG Diploma in Still Photography and PG Diploma in Acting
Last date of application: May 8, 2013

Where: Delhi School of Communication (DSC)
What: Post Graduate Programme in Communication (PGDPC)
Last date of application: For info, visit http://www.dsc.edu.in

Where: Times School of Journalism, New Delhi.
What: PGD (Journalism) – English and Hindi
Last date of application: April 30, 2013

Where: Indian Institute of Mass Communication (IIMC)
What: PG Diploma Course in Journalism (English)
Last date of application: April 22, 2013

Where: Asian College of Journalism, Chennai
What: Postgraduate Diploma programme
Last date of application: April 30, 2013

Where: Manipal Institute of Communication
What: MA in Communication
Last date of application: March 21, 2013

Where: ISB&M School of Communication
What: Post Graduate Media and Communication – Advertising, Public Relations, Print and Broadcast Journalism, Film & TV Production
Last date of application: For info, email at http://isbmmedia.edu.in

If you information on the entrance and admission details of any other media course, do share the information in the comments section. We will gladly add it to our list.

Sources:
http://www.mediahive.co.in/admission.html

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Denzil Lewis

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Professional Interview with Denzil Lewis, Editor at WATBlog (WATConsult Pvt. Ltd.)

Posted on 18 February 2013 by BMMBoxer


Denzil Lewis

Denzil Lewis

Name: Denzil Lewis

Company: WATMedia
Designation: Editor @WATBlog

Questions:
Since when have you been in the field of journalism/reporting?
I have been blogging for more than a year now. I used to work in social media as a content writer and then I took to blogging because of my love for technology and the web. Since, WATMedia already had a blog which deal with these topic, I took up blogging for it. I became the blog’s Editor last year in March/April.

What are the skills required to be a responsible journalist?
Strong Ethics and clear writing – A journalist owes it to the world to deliver truthful information to their readers. A blogger is no different. You have to take particular care to produce bias-free written material and not be taken in by emotion while writing. If you have a strong emotional connect with the piece you are writing, then you should make it an opinion piece and clearly mark it as such. Besides ethics, the way you explain things to your readers is of paramount importance. If you are writing about technology like a particularly complex mechanism, you have make sure that your audience gets it. People are very busy these days and in all probability they will not like it when things are not clear. Hence, you should pay special attention to your communication skill, both written and vocal. Writing is not about using fancy words buts breaking down fancy concepts into simple understandable language which can be read by all.

What are the various fields in journalism that a student can consider? (For example, positions in blogs, newspapers, magazines, etc.)
Blogging is the easiest way to get into the thick of things. Start blogging about anything that interests even if you do that on a personal blog. If you keep it up, you will slowly get the hang of writing. Then using this experience, you can apply to any blog, newspaper or magazine you like. If you have been writing well and have been getting an increasing amount of readers, chances are that these publications will come to you. What you write about and how you do it is most of the battle. Stick with it and things will happen.


How does one cross the bridge from journalist to editor?

By writing ceaselessly about things that I care about. I established my expertise in a particular segment and since I wrote so much, I was asked to look over all the content that WATBlog generates. Of course, there are additional responsibilities when you become an editor. You are in charge of running the publication from a content perspective and making sure that everything conforms to the publication’s standards and rules. You can only handle that after you get some good writing experience under your belt.

You think active, current blogs are the future of journalism? (perhaps, even replacing newspapers)
I love blogs! Blogs democratize the entire journalism process. I don’t read newspapers anymore because I get more information (in technology) from global blogs. In fact, I think blogs should be given the same recognition as that of established newspapers since they make sure that information is doled out to everyone who wants it. In most cases, bloggers don’t even do it to make money. They do it because they have a compulsive itch to write and inform. Personally, I think newspapers are a dated concept. Everyone is switching to a blog format because blogs are the real analogue to physical newspapers on the web. As technology grows and becomes pervasive, I see no need to go ahead and read newspapers as long you have a smartphone with which youwhich you can access an online blog/publication. Save paper!


How can a fresher land a job in a publication/media agency?

Curiosity and willingness to take risks without thinking too much of the consequences beforehand. I have a degree in Earth Sciences! There is no real need for a background if you have the interest and willingness to do the job at hand. If you are passionate about something and actually go ahead and do something about it, I am sure you will get whatever you want.
Publications want to know how you write. Instead of taking tests and writing samples in the interview, I suggest that you maintain a blog beforehand (like a I said before). Write and develop your style and when you approach any publication/agency, just show your blog to them. If it is good, you will get in. I didn’t do any of this since I had no clue but things worked in my favor. It might not always happen to everyone.


What skills must a student hone if he/she wishes to be a journalist?

  • Journalistic ethics
  • Humanism
  • Simple, clear writing
  • The ability to identify a story
  • Removal of personal and societal bias
  • Being connected to your environment (in this case the sector you are writing about)
  • Devour as much good writing as you can
  • Just start writing
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Ankita Shreeram

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Alumni Interview with Ankita Shreeram, Assistant Producer at CNBC Awaaz

Posted on 13 February 2013 by BMMBoxer

Introduction


Ankita Shreeram

Ankita Shreeram


My Name is: Ankita Shreeram
BMM College
: K.C. College
BMM Specialisation: Journalism (Batch of 2010)
Currently Working at: CNBC Awaaz

Ankita’s Take
Does being a BMMite give you an edge over others in the field of media?
Yes, it does because in all probability you already have quite a few media internships under your belt. In addition, projects that involve practical work such as designing magazines and advertisements lend you at least a beginner’s level proficiency in software used in the media industry.

Do the subjects in BMM help you know the reality of the job? Is there any place for theory in the creative world?
Most of the subjects in the first couple of years are intended towards building a theoretic foundation and they don’t help further your knowledge of the professional world that much. But the subjects in the third year definitely do, as they are better oriented towards your area of specialisation. There is always place for theory as they are references you dip into.

BMM or BMM from a particular college? Does it make a difference?

BMM from a particular college, I’d say. Jai Hind, K.C. and Xavier’s share most of the faculty and they tend to be the best in the field. Other colleges like SIES, Wilson and Sophia College also offer good professors and courses.

Internships during colleges – are they relevant in the long run?
Internships are possibly the most relevant aspect of the BMM course. Of course, they need to be executed with integrity, towards an intention to learn and build contacts rather than just attain a certificate at the end of it all. Internships can fructify into job offers many a times and the experience is certainly invaluable.

Work Experience or Higher Studies? What’s your pick? Why?
Media is not an education-intensive field. Good media professionals are carved out of rigorous on-field experience rather than perfect grades in their exams. That said, a post-graduation is essential for better compensation in the long run. I would only recommend a year-long course in an institute that offers good exposure to industry professionals and an impressive placement record. Alternatively, the same pinnacle of success and monetary compensation can be reached with work experience alone if the right job shifts are made at strategic points in one’s career.

Tips for BMMBoxers
BMM is… a practical course full of variety and scope for experimentation.
Your favourite subjects in BMM: Organizational behaviour, Indian regional journalism, Creative writing, Journalism and public opinion, Reporting, Editing

5 Must-Follow Tips for BMMites:

  1. Don’t rely on the classroom alone for knowledge and learning
  2. Be outgoing, grab opportunities, and speak to as many people as you can
  3. Focus on letting your creative juices inspire your projects and don’t worry about grades
  4. Stay updated with what’s happening around you and do read a couple of newspapers daily
  5. Ask as many questions as you can. This is a course designed for inquiry and challenge, not blind acceptance of outdated facts


Current BMM students can connect with you on:

Twitter @AnkitaShreeram
http://ankitashreeram.blogspot.com

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BMM Syllabus – Semester 6 (Journalism)

Posted on 23 January 2013 by BMMBoxer

Paper-I — PRESS LAW AND ETHICS

Marks: 100 (Theory:60, Internals: 40)

Topic of lectures

  • Law
  • Introduction to Laws
  • Classification of Laws
  • Copyright Act and Intellectual property Rights
  • Official Secrets Act
  • Press Council of India act 1978
  • Contempt of courts Act, 1971
  • Other Laws aimed at curbing press freedom
  • Introduction of The Indian Evidence Act 1872
  • Ethics
  • Advertiser and Ownership influence and interference etc.

Paper-II — BROADCAST JOURNALISM

Marks: 100 (Theory:60, Internals: 40)

Objectives:

  • ¾ To understand the development of broadcast journalism in India
  • ¾ Lean skills and techniques required for broadcast journalism
  • ¾ To learn how to handle equipment- a camcorder and recorder – for a story
  • ¾ Regional language broadcast journalism to be examinaed as a growing and flourishing field

Topic of lectures

  • History of the development of radio journalism
  • The potential of radio as a broadcast medium
  • Radio news formats
  • Writing news for radio
  • Skills of speaking over the radio
  • Principles of sound and production techniques
  • History of the development of TV Journalism
  • TV journalism – local , regional, national and international
  • TV news in the regional languages
  • TV journalism formats ; evolution and popularity of new forms on TB
  • Scripting news for TV
  • Principles of video camera use
  • Skills of anchoring or presenting
  • Videotape editing
  • Examining Broadcast journalism and allegations of ‘dumbing down’ of news
  • Understanding the power of the image


Paper-III — BUSINESS AND MAGAZINE JOURNALISM (COMBINATION OF NICHE I AND II)

Marks: 100 (Theory:60, Internals: 40)

Topic of lectures

  • Brief history
  • The structure of financial management
  • The Budget preparation and presentation
  • Companies, balance sheets, AGMs window dressing of balance sheets, the loopholes
  • Stock exchange, Sensex and its ups and downs
  • Ethics for business journalism
  • Magazine journalism
  • Magazines during post emergency
  • Western craze among glossy women’s magazines
  • Writing and editing for magazines
  • Role of Alternative media to deal with people’s issues.

Paper-IV — INTERNET AND ISSUES IN THE GLOBAL MEDIA

Marks: 100 (Theory:60, Internals: 40)

Objectives:

  • ¾ Examine global journalism as a newly emerging reality – it’s implications, strengths and weakness
  • ¾ To examine the journalistic scene in S.Asia
  • ¾ Learning about the Internet as a news medium
  • ¾ Equipping students with basic skills required for internet reporting and editing

Topic of lectures

  • Global journalism
  • Internet journalism
  • Reporting and editing for the net
  • Developing your own web site
  • Internet design
  • News Agencies
  • International news flow
  • Politics of representation of the ‘third world’ in international press
  • International reporting
  • Reporting International politics
  • Challenges to international journalism
  • International law and the role of Western media in defining human rights, and thinking the concept of human rights from a Third World media perspective
  • Asian region and the need for greater connectivity

Paper-V — NEWS MEDIA MANAGEMENT

Marks: 100 (Theory:60, Internals: 40)

Objectives:

  • ¾ To make students aware of the structure, functioning and responsibilities of managements of  media orgainsations
  • ¾ To create awareness of laws governing media orgainsations and their complexities in a globalised world in the wake of an information explosion.

Topic of lectures

  • Types of ownership and their agendas
  • Ideal management structure
  • Management role in ensuring editorial freedom.
  • Organisational structure
  • Financial management
  • Specialized training for skilled workers
  • Marshalling resources
  • Marketing strategies
  • Challenges of globalization, liberalization
  • Legal aspects

Paper-VI — CONTEMPORARY ISSUES

Max. Marks: 100 (Theory:60, Internals: 40)

Objectives:

  • ¾ To sensitize students to the environment around them
  • ¾ Developing a perspective towards issues related to the marginalized sections of the society

Topic of lectures

  • Ecological system, services and Economics of Environmental Protection
  • Concepts of human rights and civil liberties
  • Regional issues – Economics, Social, Political
  • Sugar Lobby, operation Flood, Terrorism, tribal Movement, etc.
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Alumni Interview: Akshada Bhalerao

Posted on 24 August 2012 by BMMBoxer

Introduction

My Name is: Akshada Bhalerao

Age: 23

BMM College: R. D. National College

BMM Specialisation: Journalism

Currently Working at: Disney Media Distribution and Syndication for The Walt Disney Company India (Which now includes the UTV group as well)

Akshada’s Take

Does being a BMMite give you an edge over others?

It does give you an edge because you’re exposed to most of the spheres of media and you begin to understand them. Working on many presentations gives you analytical powers and in tricky situations you do get last minute jugaad ideas as well.

Do the subjects in BMM help you know the reality of the job? Is there any place for theory in the creative world?

Well, it depends on what line of work you’re in. Theory is not emphasized as much in any line of work. It just helps you understand the very basics. Other stuff, you learn on the job.

BMM or BMM from a particular college? Does it make a difference?

Well, not college per say. But yes, exposure does matter. It’s very important to have good teachers, visiting faculty from the field, good projects and other activities.

Internships during colleges – are they relevant in the long run?

Internships are relevant, I feel. You know what you’re getting into later.

Career Queries

Work Ex or Higher Studies? What’s your pick? Why?

I’d suggest, start with work. It helps you sort many things in your head. A PG later doesn’t hurt.

How did you start your career?

I was confused after BMM. I had taken up Journalism only because I liked to write. But my strong liking has always been towards TV. Even in my internships, even though they had been with news channels, I was handling the production aspect for them. So I worked in production for reality shows.

Were you clear about which field you wanted to get into right from the beginning?

Like I said, I wasn’t clear if I wanted to be in hardcore journalism. Internships helped get a clear perspective.

Any particular incident that helped you decide on your career option?

Nothing in particular.

Tips for BMMBoxers

BMM is… A very good course if you want to be in Media

Your favourite subject in BMM: Literature

5 Tips for BMMites:

  • Stick to Deadlines
  • Respect time, yours and others
  • Take interest and try to explore things on your own
  • Stay updated about the industry you are interested in
  • Don’t take it too hard if your boss shouts at you!

Contact Me

Students can post queries in the comment section. I will respond as soon as I can.

Interview by Prasiddhi Munoth

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Difference Between A News Report and A Feature

Posted on 09 August 2012 by Milana Rao (Contributing Writer)

A newspaper is like a treasure house. It is one document that has all types and kinds of content in it, from fresh news updates to sports news, from page 3 gossips to political/city news. It even has the entertainment section which includes game puzzles, Sudoku, comic strips, zodiac predictions, etc. For the sake of this article, we will be dealing with two sections of the newspaper, namely: news report and a feature report.

Both the news report and the feature are news stories that contain facts and information and yet both of them are different. What exactly is the difference between a news report and a feature report then?

A news report is basically a general reporting of an event that has occurred. The report is filled with facts and information. It usually contains answers to all the “5 W’s” i.e. Why, Where, What, Who and How. The event that is covered in a news report is fresh and current.  News reports include certain beats such as crime, politics, education, sports, etc.

The main purpose of a news story is to inform the people what is happening around them. It generally follows a pattern known as ‘The Inverted Pyramid’ which means writing the facts and information in the order of its importance. The main information at the beginning of the article means people can get the gist of the news report at a quick glance, thus ensuring good use of their time.

Also, with the increasing need and demand of advertisements in the newspaper, there is hardly any space available to accommodate many. Sometimes in order to accommodate an advertisement, there is always the danger of the news article being chopped from the bottom. Hence, ‘The Inverted Pyramid’ format is followed.

The news report has a headline, an introducing paragraph, the body of the news covering the main questions pertaining to the “5 W’s” and the tail paragraph. The average words range between 700 to 1200 words. News stories also contain at least one of the following important characteristics relative to the intended audience: proximity, prominence, timeliness, human interest, oddity, or consequence. The personal opinion of the writer or reporter is not expressed in the news report.

Feature news on the other hand also contains factual information like that of news report. However the feature news is not necessarily fresh or current news. A good feature goes deeper than just a press release as it thoroughly explores an issue from all direction. The feature news consists of quotes from important people pertaining to the story of the feature news. It analyses the events, ask pertinent questions and seeks answers. It does not merely report, it ponders. The writer  or reporter gives his opinions in a feature piece. Different writers follow different styles of writing news features. This very difference in every news feature makes it unique in its own way. The average words in a feature news range between 2000 to 2500 words.

Both, news report and features complete the newspaper copy that is delivered to your doorstep daily. One is quite handicapped without the other

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Sixteen Rules Of Editing

Posted on 02 August 2012 by Garima Chak

Knowing how to edit an article is almost as important as knowing how to write well. A well written piece, loses its sheen if it isn’t edited properly. Therefore we need to talk about a few sacred rules of editing, which can make a piece of good writing great.

1. I am pretty sure that most of us think that the first and foremost part of editing is to spell-check. But I would beg to differ. For although it is extremely important, it often happens that once we are done with it we think that that is all the editing we need to do. This is of course far from the truth. That is why I suggest that even before you spell check your article, you read it thoroughly to make sure that the sentences and paragraphs are in place, and that everything makes sense when put together.

2. Next comes the checking of spellings. The word processing spellchecker is not foolproof. So beware! Whenever in doubt, use a dictionary to check your spellings.

3. What follows next are grammar, capitalization, subject/verb agreement, tenses and word usage. Tips: verbs have to agree with their subjects, a sentence cannot end with a preposition and cannot start with a conjunction and infinitive words are not meant to be split.

4. Make sure that the sentence construction is up to the mark. Each sentence should have two parts: the subject and the predicate. Use sentence combining words wherever possible. And no sentence fragments please.

5. Avoid very long sentences as there are more chances of you making mistakes there.

6. Please do not use repetitive redundancies. They can put off a reader no matter how interesting the theme of your piece of writing might be. Avoid clichés as much as possible. Better still, avoid them completely. And while you are at it try doing away with comparisons as well- they are almost as bad as clichés. Try and be as specific as possible, using and choosing your words economically.

7. If you want your readers’ attention, talk to him. For this you need to do away with the use of passive voice altogether. Remember, you are not writing a novel.

8. The three things you must not do:
§ Do not repeat a point you want to stress on. Remember, understatement is the best as well as the surest way of putting forward an earth shaking idea.
§ Do not exaggerate.
§ Do not go overboard with your use of punctuation marks. They can kill an article when in excess. But do not forget to use them where necessary.

9. Avoid using quotations, similes, metaphors and rhetorical questions unless the point you are trying to make cannot be made without them. Avoid generalisations as well as one word sentences.

10. Keep the use of foreign words and phrases at bay.

11. We are not living in the Shakespearean era, so avoid old English. Use British English or American English, according to the demands of the article. In either case make sure your English usage is in the correct form. Avoid the use of funny English, unless you are writing a funny article of course.

12. Alliterations should be avoided. They sound good when used judiciously in poetry and prose, but will probably not have the same effect when used in an official or a formal document.

13. Always finish with sentence with a full stop. This is a very common oversight, but one that can easily be avoided.

14. Please place your footnotes at the bottom of each page and not at the end of the chapter. Make sure you number your notes and references correctly.

15. Bibliographical references should be in alphabetical order and in the proper format, for example, use the full name of the author and the book when referring to a book, the complete email address when referring to an email etc.

16. And last but not the least, proof read religiously to see if anything is amiss. Read forwards and backwards, read each sentence separately, making sure that each makes sense even when read alone. Double check if you feel unsure. But don’t overdo it. Learn to trust yourself.

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