Tag Archive | "careers"

Storytelling

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5 Habits of Highly Successful Copywriters

Posted on 23 July 2013 by BMMBoxer

Thinking about a career in copy0writing? Think you’ve got what it takes? If you’ve ever wondered what makes a good copywriter then this is a must read for you. Written by Vishal Khandelwal on copywriterinindia, here’s a comprehensive article on 5 habits of highly successful copywriters.

Habit #1: Successful Copywriters…Read a Lot

The first habit of highly successful copywriters is not related to writing! Instead, it is about ‘reading’. If you want to become a successful writer or copywriter, you must ‘read a lot’. It’s as simple as this – if you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Reading creates an ease and intimacy with the process of writing. Regular reading will pull you into a place where you can write eagerly and without self-consciousness. Successful writers read with an eye for good writing.

Habit #2: Successful Copywriters…Write a Lot

For a copywriter, practicing the art of writing is extremely important. Successful copywriters are those who burn the midnight oil practicing this art to perfection. If you are trying to become a good copywriter yourself, try writing every day. Ideas will be hard to come by initially, but with patience and consistent hard work, your mind will become a repository of good ideas. And that is when you will realise the worth of your practice.

Habit #3: Successful Copywriters…Use the ‘Power of One’

Writing about one, and just one big idea is one of the best habits. Readers don’t (like to) hear everything a writer has to say on a particular topic. They are just looking for that single, useful suggestion or piece of information that could benefit them. Lincoln’s one big idea was ‘liberty’. Gandhi’s one big idea was ‘non-violence’. Martin Luther King’s one big idea was ‘equality’. History is replete with examples of how a person has focused on his one big idea to revolutionize an entire race or country.

Habit #4: Successful Copywriters…Understand Emotions

‘Emotions’ are the bed rock of great copywriting. If you don’t have them, you don’t understand them and you can’t trigger them. In order to become a successful copywriter, you must be able to engage your prospects emotionally. You should engage the reader so much that the product or service starts to seem like a solution to the problem the reader is facing.

Habit #5: Successful Copywriters…Tell Stories

Everyone loves stories! Stories create magic, especially because they take us to a different unreal world. All our problems cease to exist for those moments. In the same way, as a copywriter, you must write as if you are telling a story face to face to your listener (reader). Engage him in an informal conversation, as if you are talking to a good friend.

Like all storytellers…

  • Use expressions.
  • Use emotions.
  • Offer help.
  • Ask questions.
  • Make promises.
  • Make him debate, disagree with you.
  • Given him a benefit (like the moral of the story

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Internship Alert: Social Media Management & Content Writing At SellMojo

Posted on 13 July 2013 by BMMBoxer

Organization Name: SellMojo

Organization Description: SellMojo is a unique social commerce platform, offering businesses the opportunity to sell to their customers with fun, accessibility, and ease within Facebook. SellMojo combines the best parts of an online store platform with a social shopping experience.

Location: Chembur, Next to R.K. Studios

Role Title: Intern

Role Description: Social Media, Content creation

Role Responsibilities:

  • Manage SellMojo’s presence on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ in tandem with the team
  • Pitch post ideas to bloggers who write about the industries in which we operate
  • Launch contests and giveaways for our users

Qualification Requirement:

  • College student

Skill Set Requirement:

  • Smart
  • Hard worker
  • Detail oriented
  • Talented writer

Experience Requirement: Previous experience with content writing would be beneficial. Even if they don’t have previous experience, ability to create content is required.

Compensation/Stipend: Rs 5000/month

Application Process: Write to Nameet/Janvi on hello@SellMojo.com

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wildlife2

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Alternative Careers, 2: Wildlife Photography

Posted on 01 June 2013 by BMMBoxer

– By Mariya Sethjiwala, Sophia College

Nature, in all its forms, presents not only a great escape from the hustles of city, but if you look through your lenses closely, it can provide various career opportunities. Ever thought YOU could be a wildlife photographer? Today, photography has become a common hobby for the metro youth. The great thing is it is a highly diverse profession. One of the most interesting and challenging streams of photography surely is Wildlife Photography.


A passion for photography and a great deal of knowledge about cameras and lenses is a must to start with when you talk about becoming a wildlife photographer. Apart from that, you need to have a genuine love for animals, birds, forests and everything natural. This profession, whether taken up as a hobby or a profession, requires a great deal of perseverance and patience from the photographer. Moreover, it is imperative that you respect your subjects. Awareness about the various laws of forest and environment and their compliance is a necessity.
As such, being a wildlife photographer requires no formal training. Most wildlife photographers would tell you they started doing it just by chance on some camping trip or a family holiday to forest reserves! If you are intrigued by nature, start as soon as you lay your hands on a camera. Who says you have to get to a forest? Begin by observing closely your surroundings and environment and the creatures that live around.


When you decide on turning a pro, a journey that might well change the way you see the tiniest of things awaits you. Getting close to nature also involves communicating well with the forest officials and even local tribesmen. You have to get information from these people as to what is the most suitable time and place to shoot the animals, birds or any aspect of nature you are looking to capture. Doing your homework before you start shooting and drawing up a schedule is also an important aspect of shooting in the wild.
After you have done your shooting and finished working for the day, the important task of getting your work noticed lies ahead. It is advisable to do as much independent work as possible when you have just started off. You can share your work with magazines, newspapers or even wildlife NGOs. You can even use your pictures as cards and calendar backgrounds. Hosting exhibitions and booking gallery shows to display your work once you get known in the local market is what will follow.


Fortunately, India’s rich and diverse wildlife offers great opportunities to photographers to capture breath-taking images. After all the hard-work and, just one amazing image is enough to make your day!

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DJ Alia

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Alternative Careers, 1: DJ

Posted on 25 May 2013 by BMMBoxer

- By Mariya Sethjiwala, Sophia College

The scratching sound of a disc, the innumerable keys on the sound board, the lights of the dance floor, the thump of the music – if this gives you an adrenaline rush, then surely, a part of you wants to make people dance to your tunes and take a party by storm. To be a DJ is the career you need to zero in on then!

Not regarded as a mainstream career option till a while back, Disc Jockeying or DJ-ing today has emerged to be a successful career option for people who know their music and can create foot-tapping numbers to dance on. With the increase in per capita income and the willingness of people to spend on celebrations- no matter big or small, music remains the key. The soaring high awareness of good music among the party-goers and party-hosts has made a good DJ one of the most sought after people in the media industry.

To give you a very basic explanation, a DJ is the person who selects and plays pre-recorded music for a gathered audience for a variety of events and functions. Most professional DJs do much more than just play music: they are responsible for mixing tunes, forming beats, setting the right mood in the club, understanding the clientele and playing music according to their likes and dislikes.

To become successful in any profession isn’t a piece of cake and DJ-ing is no exception. Knowledge of the technicalities of sound is a must if you want to be a DJ; that means concentrating hard in your Radio and Television lectures in the fourth semester of BMM. But let me tell you that these lectures will simply give you a sketchy base. There’s a sea of things you will need to know and learn about like cartridges, needles, mixers, tables and the list is endless.

I’d advise you to follow the current trends of music. A DJ should know at the tip of his fingers what sort of music is in and what is out. Stay glued to top music channels and keep a track on what’s playing on the radio stations as well. Practice is what will make or break your career. Wouldn’t it be really uncool if people are staring at the ceiling when you are playing your music instead of dancing? You need to get hands on training to prepare for your big night. So if you really are sure you want to be a DJ and are willing to spend massive amounts on equipment, then go ahead and buy your own tools. But a wiser option would be to work as an assistant to a DJ and get to used his equipment and learn from him.

The bottom line is that you must strike the right chord with your audience. Once you do then a life of fun, music and a lot of ‘scratching’ awaits you!

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Soft Skills are pre-requisite to getting the job you desire

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Graduation Queries, 3: How To Prepare For A Job Interview

Posted on 15 April 2013 by BMMBoxer

Job Interview Essentials

Job Interview Essentials

An interview is not just a test of the technical and communication skills you possess, but also an assessment of how you can handle pressure. Hence it’s important to be fundamentally strong but also psychologically prepared. Here are few pointers to keep in mind when you’re preparing for a job interview:

  • Analysis of Job Requirements: Take time off to analyze the job thoroughly and understand primarily what the company expects from a prospective candidate. This helps you ascertain whether you’re qualified for the job and more importantly whether the job is what you’re looking for. Once you’re sure, list out the job requirements. Match these requirements with your assets, right from experience to on the job skills. Review these and keep them in mind, something that is sure to help you when you’re face to face with the interviewer.
  • Know the Company: Find out as much about the company as possible. Talking to present employees can be beneficial as it will help you learn more about the company culture and its present position in the market. It always helps to be well informed.
  • Practice Makes Perfect: While it might be impossible to replicate the ‘interview ambience’, it helps to practice answering basic interview questions with a friend or family member. This can help you develop a sound mindset and protect you from going blank when it comes to the real time.
Participate in mock-up interviews to better you chances

Participate in mock-up interviews to better you chances

  • The Other Factors: While these might not be chief factors in the decision making process, they undoubtedly contribute to an overall impression. The ‘Other Factors’ include dressing, punctuality and etiquette. Pay attention to what you wear so you look your best. Reach the interview location on time.  Make sure you maintain a right posture throughout. More importantly, stay relaxed at all times.
Soft Skills are pre-requisite to getting the job you desire

Soft Skills are pre-requisite to getting the job you desire

  • A Two-Way Street: Simply put, an interview is you answering the question put forward to you. But make sure to listen too when you get the chance. Be attentive and engage the person by asking questions.  Greet everyone at the interview and maintain an open two way communication stream. Professionalism tinged with a friendly tone is generally a hit.
  • The Follow Up: It helps to go the extra mile. Follow up with a thank you mail/message. Be polite and show the interviewer that this job means a lot to you. The small supplementary factors help differentiate the better from the good.

Interviews test a person on various levels. It is vital to stay prepared because it is the one shot you have at creating a lasting impression. Since every interview could be a prospective job, it helps to be honest when it matters. Knowing what you want is paramount in the entire process and make sure you stay confident throughout. Especially in your ability to deliver when it matters.

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Bon Appetit

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Professional Interview with Prachi Joshi, Food Writer/Blogger

Posted on 13 March 2013 by BMMBoxer

Food! Food! Food! No one can get enough of food and all conversations invariably lead to food. So much is the craze around all things culinary that food blogs are in fact the flavour of the season. Given the attention that this field is garnering now-a-days, to get into the Food Blogging profession seems like a great idea after all!

Keeping this in mind and with the view of letting you in on what it takes to be a food blogger, we interviewed Prachi Joshi – a food (and travel) writer/blogger par excellence. Read her thoughts and opinions on what it takes to do well in this field. And yes, your diet plans may go for a toss after all!

Name: Prachi Joshi
Company: Deliciously Directionless (personal website) + Freelance writer
Designation: Food & Travel Writer

Prachi Joshi

Prachi Joshi

Q1. When and why did you take the decision to start your journey as a food blogger?

I have always wanted to write. In fact, I quit my corporate marketing job of 9 years to write! I decided to start with a blog, to test the waters, so to speak. Food and Travel are two topics that are close to my heart and I thought I’d start writing about that. So one lazy Sunday in June 2012, I put pen to paper (figuratively) and created my blog – Deliciously Directionless – on Blogger.com. My very first post was a recipe for a Bread Pudding, which I could make with one hand tied behind my back! My blog chronicles my experiments in the kitchen, reviews of restaurants, travel notes as well as interviews and guest posts by prominent people in the food industry. It’s been just 9 months since I’ve been blogging, but the experiences that I have had and the opportunities that have come my way are truly mind boggling.

Q2. What is a day like in your life as a food blogger?

Let me describe a week in my life, instead – I do at least one post on my blog every week, sometimes two. So, some of my time is taken up in writing the post, researching a bit (if required), editing pictures etc. I also work at having a pipeline of posts in place – this is especially useful when I’m travelling and I cannot devote time to writing on the road. But the blog has to keep going, right? So I keep draft posts ready that I can publish from the road.
I’m quite active on social media. Social Media (SM) is a great way of keeping the conversation going with readers and peers in the industry. The food blogging community is very active on these platforms and it’s great to read what others have been writing about, sharing my own posts, thoughts and comments. Being a part of the community means you always have someone to turn to when you need any information or advice; help is usually a tweet away. Also many food magazines, restaurants and brands are on SM and it helps to keep abreast with what’s happening in the food world – both in India and over the world. So some of my time is spent reading – online and offline. Since I’m also a freelance writer, I stay in touch with what food & travel magazines / papers / writers / editors put out in SM – you never know where your next story idea or a media connection is going to come from. SM is a brilliant way of building and maintaining a relationship with your clients and community. I also use SM as a marketing tool, but I do not solely put out my content out there; I share other bloggers’ posts, interesting (but relevant) articles, upcoming events, deals etc.
A significant part of my time also goes into attending food-related events – bloggers’ meets, restaurant openings, chef’s tables, trade shows, cook-ups, potlucks etc. Some of these lead to blog posts, some are for networking and some are purely for fun. But all are a platform for meeting like-minded people and exchanging ideas (and sometimes, food!).

Why Not Start A Food Blog!?

Why Not Start A Food Blog!?

Q3. How does one avoid the trap of turning into a restaurant’s mouthpiece? (Or how does one stay true to the blog?)

Be clear right from the beginning – when you get an invite to attend a bloggers’ meet, tell the PR company that you’ll be giving an honest review – the good, the bad & the ugly. Even if you’re reviewing a restaurant anonymously, you owe it the readers to give a correct picture. Having said that, I usually avoid visiting a restaurant in its first couple of weeks since that’s the time the place is finding its feet and ironing out the wrinkles. Chances of hiccups (minor or major) cannot be overruled and it isn’t fair to pronounce judgment prematurely.

Are You 'Deliciously Directionless', too?!

Are You 'Deliciously Directionless', too?!

Q4. What are the tips you’d share with young food enthusiasts who wish to pursue a career in food blogging?

Have a genuine interest in food. Food blogging is not merely about going to restaurants and doing reviews. Learn how to cook. This will help you to understand ingredients and what works together and it’ll help refine your palette.
Experiment with photography – light, angles, close-ups. Make your images draw in your readers to your content. At the same time, don’t clutter your entire post with pictures, unless you’re doing a photo-essay!
Tell a story – even if you’re posting a recipe, give a short background; maybe the origin of the dish, or why you like to cook it, or where you learned it from, anything that adds a personal touch to your post.
Be a part of the food bloggers’ networks. There are several established ones online (Foodista, Foodie Blogroll, Foodblogs, Indiblogger etc.) and they are a good way of forming networks and interact with fellow bloggers. Many of them also run contests regularly, which are a good way of getting out of your comfort zone and writing to a brief, instead of just what you want to write.

Q5. What are the cardinal rules a food blogger must live by?

Be yourself – find your own voice and do not try to imitate anyone’s writing style. It’ll never sound real.
Be honest – without being disrespectful. This one is really important. Even if you have negative things to say, be objective about it and don’t get personal. Be courteous to your readers, your clients, your blogging community. Always respond to messages, comments and tweets (except when you’re being trolled). Being nice never killed anyone!
Never ever plagiarise – if you’re referencing someone’s work, always give due credit. Ask for permission before you use anyone’s images.
Content is king – yes, this is a cliche, but true! If you’re not offering good, relevant content why would a reader be back? Value your reader’s time by providing quality recipes and honest opinion pieces. And while we’re on the subject of content, please ensure that your piece is well written, without grammatical mistakes and glaring typos.
Write, write, write – the more you write, the better your writing will be. This also means putting up posts on a regular basis, preferably a fixed day of the week. Maintain your focus and let food be the star of your blog, even when you’re doing a travel story or an interview.
Read, read, read – find out the good food writers, bloggers, magazines etc. This will help you identify trends and be at the forefront of it. That’s how you’ll offer value to your readers. And when you really like a post, leave a comment. Build a relationship, without an agenda. Provide links to other blogs in your posts (where relevant) and share the writing of others with your readers.

Food For Peace

Say Cheese!

Q6. Are there some food blogger myths you’d like to break?!

You don’t need to understand technology – this is myth number 1. Even if you are hosting your blog on a platform such as Blogger or WordPress, understanding how they work will help you tweak the blog to suit your requirements. And if you don’t know something, help is a Google search away. Learn the basics of search engine optimisation (SEO) – how to use keywords to ensure that your blog comes up higher in the list of search results. There are plenty of online resources to help you with this.
You don’t need to market yourself - let’s face it; you’re writing so that people read you. Do not rely on just your friend network to increase traffic to your blog (doesn’t work anyway). Make use of SM – Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+ and what have you. I find that Twitter works really well in connecting you with people – readers, clients, other food bloggers, brands etc. So make sure you have an online presence and use it judiciously.
You know everything – it’s just not possible! Be open to learning from others and keep improving – your writing, photography, blog design. Attend workshops; and go there to listen, not to show off your knowledge.

Bon Appetit

Bon Appetit

I hope this has been helpful! Good luck to all the aspiring food bloggers. And bon appetit!

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