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Professional Interview with Prachi Joshi, Food Writer/Blogger

Posted on 13 March 2013 by BMMBoxer

Food! Food! Food! No one can get enough of food and all conversations invariably lead to food. So much is the craze around all things culinary that food blogs are in fact the flavour of the season. Given the attention that this field is garnering now-a-days, to get into the Food Blogging profession seems like a great idea after all!

Keeping this in mind and with the view of letting you in on what it takes to be a food blogger, we interviewed Prachi Joshi – a food (and travel) writer/blogger par excellence. Read her thoughts and opinions on what it takes to do well in this field. And yes, your diet plans may go for a toss after all!

Name: Prachi Joshi
Company: Deliciously Directionless (personal website) + Freelance writer
Designation: Food & Travel Writer

Prachi Joshi

Prachi Joshi

Q1. When and why did you take the decision to start your journey as a food blogger?

I have always wanted to write. In fact, I quit my corporate marketing job of 9 years to write! I decided to start with a blog, to test the waters, so to speak. Food and Travel are two topics that are close to my heart and I thought I’d start writing about that. So one lazy Sunday in June 2012, I put pen to paper (figuratively) and created my blog – Deliciously Directionless – on Blogger.com. My very first post was a recipe for a Bread Pudding, which I could make with one hand tied behind my back! My blog chronicles my experiments in the kitchen, reviews of restaurants, travel notes as well as interviews and guest posts by prominent people in the food industry. It’s been just 9 months since I’ve been blogging, but the experiences that I have had and the opportunities that have come my way are truly mind boggling.

Q2. What is a day like in your life as a food blogger?

Let me describe a week in my life, instead – I do at least one post on my blog every week, sometimes two. So, some of my time is taken up in writing the post, researching a bit (if required), editing pictures etc. I also work at having a pipeline of posts in place – this is especially useful when I’m travelling and I cannot devote time to writing on the road. But the blog has to keep going, right? So I keep draft posts ready that I can publish from the road.
I’m quite active on social media. Social Media (SM) is a great way of keeping the conversation going with readers and peers in the industry. The food blogging community is very active on these platforms and it’s great to read what others have been writing about, sharing my own posts, thoughts and comments. Being a part of the community means you always have someone to turn to when you need any information or advice; help is usually a tweet away. Also many food magazines, restaurants and brands are on SM and it helps to keep abreast with what’s happening in the food world – both in India and over the world. So some of my time is spent reading – online and offline. Since I’m also a freelance writer, I stay in touch with what food & travel magazines / papers / writers / editors put out in SM – you never know where your next story idea or a media connection is going to come from. SM is a brilliant way of building and maintaining a relationship with your clients and community. I also use SM as a marketing tool, but I do not solely put out my content out there; I share other bloggers’ posts, interesting (but relevant) articles, upcoming events, deals etc.
A significant part of my time also goes into attending food-related events – bloggers’ meets, restaurant openings, chef’s tables, trade shows, cook-ups, potlucks etc. Some of these lead to blog posts, some are for networking and some are purely for fun. But all are a platform for meeting like-minded people and exchanging ideas (and sometimes, food!).

Why Not Start A Food Blog!?

Why Not Start A Food Blog!?

Q3. How does one avoid the trap of turning into a restaurant’s mouthpiece? (Or how does one stay true to the blog?)

Be clear right from the beginning – when you get an invite to attend a bloggers’ meet, tell the PR company that you’ll be giving an honest review – the good, the bad & the ugly. Even if you’re reviewing a restaurant anonymously, you owe it the readers to give a correct picture. Having said that, I usually avoid visiting a restaurant in its first couple of weeks since that’s the time the place is finding its feet and ironing out the wrinkles. Chances of hiccups (minor or major) cannot be overruled and it isn’t fair to pronounce judgment prematurely.

Are You 'Deliciously Directionless', too?!

Are You 'Deliciously Directionless', too?!

Q4. What are the tips you’d share with young food enthusiasts who wish to pursue a career in food blogging?

Have a genuine interest in food. Food blogging is not merely about going to restaurants and doing reviews. Learn how to cook. This will help you to understand ingredients and what works together and it’ll help refine your palette.
Experiment with photography – light, angles, close-ups. Make your images draw in your readers to your content. At the same time, don’t clutter your entire post with pictures, unless you’re doing a photo-essay!
Tell a story – even if you’re posting a recipe, give a short background; maybe the origin of the dish, or why you like to cook it, or where you learned it from, anything that adds a personal touch to your post.
Be a part of the food bloggers’ networks. There are several established ones online (Foodista, Foodie Blogroll, Foodblogs, Indiblogger etc.) and they are a good way of forming networks and interact with fellow bloggers. Many of them also run contests regularly, which are a good way of getting out of your comfort zone and writing to a brief, instead of just what you want to write.

Q5. What are the cardinal rules a food blogger must live by?

Be yourself – find your own voice and do not try to imitate anyone’s writing style. It’ll never sound real.
Be honest – without being disrespectful. This one is really important. Even if you have negative things to say, be objective about it and don’t get personal. Be courteous to your readers, your clients, your blogging community. Always respond to messages, comments and tweets (except when you’re being trolled). Being nice never killed anyone!
Never ever plagiarise – if you’re referencing someone’s work, always give due credit. Ask for permission before you use anyone’s images.
Content is king – yes, this is a cliche, but true! If you’re not offering good, relevant content why would a reader be back? Value your reader’s time by providing quality recipes and honest opinion pieces. And while we’re on the subject of content, please ensure that your piece is well written, without grammatical mistakes and glaring typos.
Write, write, write – the more you write, the better your writing will be. This also means putting up posts on a regular basis, preferably a fixed day of the week. Maintain your focus and let food be the star of your blog, even when you’re doing a travel story or an interview.
Read, read, read – find out the good food writers, bloggers, magazines etc. This will help you identify trends and be at the forefront of it. That’s how you’ll offer value to your readers. And when you really like a post, leave a comment. Build a relationship, without an agenda. Provide links to other blogs in your posts (where relevant) and share the writing of others with your readers.

Food For Peace

Say Cheese!

Q6. Are there some food blogger myths you’d like to break?!

You don’t need to understand technology – this is myth number 1. Even if you are hosting your blog on a platform such as Blogger or WordPress, understanding how they work will help you tweak the blog to suit your requirements. And if you don’t know something, help is a Google search away. Learn the basics of search engine optimisation (SEO) – how to use keywords to ensure that your blog comes up higher in the list of search results. There are plenty of online resources to help you with this.
You don’t need to market yourself - let’s face it; you’re writing so that people read you. Do not rely on just your friend network to increase traffic to your blog (doesn’t work anyway). Make use of SM – Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+ and what have you. I find that Twitter works really well in connecting you with people – readers, clients, other food bloggers, brands etc. So make sure you have an online presence and use it judiciously.
You know everything – it’s just not possible! Be open to learning from others and keep improving – your writing, photography, blog design. Attend workshops; and go there to listen, not to show off your knowledge.

Bon Appetit

Bon Appetit

I hope this has been helpful! Good luck to all the aspiring food bloggers. And bon appetit!

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Manjula Ma’am

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Faculty Interview: Ms. Manjula Srinivas, Co-ordinator, KCBMM

Posted on 04 March 2013 by BMMBoxer

Manjula Ma'am

Manjula Ma'am

In our first faculty interview (BMM co-ordinators) in a series of 3, we touched base with Ms. Manjula – Co-ordinator, KCBMM. This soft-spoken lady kindly spoke to us about the importance of the BMM course, what sets it apart from the rest and told us why KCBMM is different from BMM offered in other colleges.

Excerpts from the interview

1. What according to you sets BMM apart from other graduation courses?

Other graduation courses are theoretical, whereas, BMM has practical components that set it apart from the rest. The structure of this course is such that a student will get hands-on experiences that will help him/her in his/her academic + professional life.

2. What skill sets must a student have if he/she wishes to take up BMM after standard 12?

I think this question is not valid in the present context because Mumbai University does not allow colleges to admit students on basis of an entrance exam. As per norms we are required to admit students on basis of merit alone. If you ask me ‘what kind of students should take this course up’ then I’d say that those who are good at writing, those who excel in various forms of communications and are good with creativity – in terms of designing, writing, presenting something in an interesting manner, should take this course up.

3. How do BMM students who seek entry into the professional media world benefit from this course?

According to me, assignments for all 36 papers that cover all genres like photography, creative writing, marketing, management, understanding cinema, and so on give students a thorough understanding of various aspects of the media world.  Further on, choosing the right specialisation in the third year and interning at a company of choice between the second year and third year break helps students understand what they are good at and what kind of work they enjoy.

4. How much weightage would you place on fests and academics in the BMM course structure?

70:30. But then again, one has to theoretically sound to apply all the knowledge practically. And for this one must be thorough in the syllabus and must excel at each module by the end of the term.

5. Some BMM myths you’d like to break?

One BMM myth I’d like to break is that fests are not life. They are an integral part of BMM as students learn a lot – people skills, management of finance, they get a chance to network and so on, but all this does not help beyond a point.

I think students need to focus on projects more and while theories might be redundant because the University has not updated the syllabus, students can make projects keeping in mind today’s requirements, changes, etc.

6. What sets KCBMM apart from BMM as offered by other colleges?

I’d say that KCBMM has stability. For one, our department and most of our faculty has not changed in 13 years. This proves to be a strong base for the course.

Additionally, I have made program difficult by incorporating essential extra components like a Certificate Course, a Program on Contemporary Issues that has been running since 8-9 years now and has been well accepted by professionals. The fact that KC students must take up compulsory internships has proved greatly beneficial too. Our two newspapers – Scribe (serious) and Slubberdigulligan (chit-chatty) gives students a platform to showcase their talents.

I don’t believe in just theoretical knowledge. I believe in challenging my students by giving them challenging projects that they are required to submit within strict deadlines and it is this that pushes them to excel.

Image Courtesy | Coolage.in

Enjoyed reading Prof. Manjula’s views? If you’d like us to interview your college co-ordinator and highlight the efforts of the BMM department of your college on BMMBox.com, then drop us an email at connect@bmmbox.com. Do mention the following details in the email: Co-ordinator’s Name, College, Subject taught, Co-ordinator’s email address/mobile number.

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Swella Fernandes

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Alumni Interview with Swella Fernandes, Freelance Events MC & Party Planner

Posted on 04 March 2013 by BMMBoxer

Introduction


Swella Fernandes

Swella Fernandes


My Name is:  Swella Fernandes
BMM College
: Wilson College
BMM Specialisation: Advertising (Batch of 2009)
Currently Working at: Freelancing as an Events MC and a Party Planner

Swella’s Take
Q. Does being a BMMite give you an edge over others in the field of media?
A. Yes it does. BMM exposes you to a lot of possibilities and helps you test your potential to the core. Having faculty specific speakers also lends to the credibility of what you’re being taught and projects give you an almost on the job experience.

Q. Do the subjects in BMM help you know the reality of the job? Is there any place for theory in the creative world?
A. In my case, it honestly didn’t really make a difference. Projects that kept us on the run were much more enriching in knowledge than theoretical leaning.

Q. BMM or BMM from a particular college? Does it make a difference?
A. I’d say, definitely BMM from a credible college. I’d say Wilson BMM is where it is today, only because of one man – Mr. Sudhakar Soloman Raj. Credibility follows his very name.

Q. Internships during colleges – are they relevant in the long run?

A. I never interned at an office as I was freelancing during my college days as well. Though I’m sure, internships do give you some kind of a perspective.

Q. Work Experience or Higher Studies? What’s your pick? Why?
A. Work experience and then higher studies. This order helps you build a body of work that you’re capable of undertaking and carves the path for a better understanding of what you could possibly need to pursue on a long term basis.

Tips for BMMBoxers
BMM is… not just a course, it’s a way of life!! You’re either cut out for it or you’re not!
Your favourite subjects in BMM: Creative Writing

Must-Follow Tips for BMMites:

  • Get used to long nights. Mostly staring at your laptop and then rushing through with preparations only the night before submission
  • Keep a monthly budget for photocopies
  • Invest in a good DSLR
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Denzil Lewis

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Professional Interview with Denzil Lewis, Editor at WATBlog (WATConsult Pvt. Ltd.)

Posted on 18 February 2013 by BMMBoxer


Denzil Lewis

Denzil Lewis

Name: Denzil Lewis

Company: WATMedia
Designation: Editor @WATBlog

Questions:
Since when have you been in the field of journalism/reporting?
I have been blogging for more than a year now. I used to work in social media as a content writer and then I took to blogging because of my love for technology and the web. Since, WATMedia already had a blog which deal with these topic, I took up blogging for it. I became the blog’s Editor last year in March/April.

What are the skills required to be a responsible journalist?
Strong Ethics and clear writing – A journalist owes it to the world to deliver truthful information to their readers. A blogger is no different. You have to take particular care to produce bias-free written material and not be taken in by emotion while writing. If you have a strong emotional connect with the piece you are writing, then you should make it an opinion piece and clearly mark it as such. Besides ethics, the way you explain things to your readers is of paramount importance. If you are writing about technology like a particularly complex mechanism, you have make sure that your audience gets it. People are very busy these days and in all probability they will not like it when things are not clear. Hence, you should pay special attention to your communication skill, both written and vocal. Writing is not about using fancy words buts breaking down fancy concepts into simple understandable language which can be read by all.

What are the various fields in journalism that a student can consider? (For example, positions in blogs, newspapers, magazines, etc.)
Blogging is the easiest way to get into the thick of things. Start blogging about anything that interests even if you do that on a personal blog. If you keep it up, you will slowly get the hang of writing. Then using this experience, you can apply to any blog, newspaper or magazine you like. If you have been writing well and have been getting an increasing amount of readers, chances are that these publications will come to you. What you write about and how you do it is most of the battle. Stick with it and things will happen.


How does one cross the bridge from journalist to editor?

By writing ceaselessly about things that I care about. I established my expertise in a particular segment and since I wrote so much, I was asked to look over all the content that WATBlog generates. Of course, there are additional responsibilities when you become an editor. You are in charge of running the publication from a content perspective and making sure that everything conforms to the publication’s standards and rules. You can only handle that after you get some good writing experience under your belt.

You think active, current blogs are the future of journalism? (perhaps, even replacing newspapers)
I love blogs! Blogs democratize the entire journalism process. I don’t read newspapers anymore because I get more information (in technology) from global blogs. In fact, I think blogs should be given the same recognition as that of established newspapers since they make sure that information is doled out to everyone who wants it. In most cases, bloggers don’t even do it to make money. They do it because they have a compulsive itch to write and inform. Personally, I think newspapers are a dated concept. Everyone is switching to a blog format because blogs are the real analogue to physical newspapers on the web. As technology grows and becomes pervasive, I see no need to go ahead and read newspapers as long you have a smartphone with which youwhich you can access an online blog/publication. Save paper!


How can a fresher land a job in a publication/media agency?

Curiosity and willingness to take risks without thinking too much of the consequences beforehand. I have a degree in Earth Sciences! There is no real need for a background if you have the interest and willingness to do the job at hand. If you are passionate about something and actually go ahead and do something about it, I am sure you will get whatever you want.
Publications want to know how you write. Instead of taking tests and writing samples in the interview, I suggest that you maintain a blog beforehand (like a I said before). Write and develop your style and when you approach any publication/agency, just show your blog to them. If it is good, you will get in. I didn’t do any of this since I had no clue but things worked in my favor. It might not always happen to everyone.


What skills must a student hone if he/she wishes to be a journalist?

  • Journalistic ethics
  • Humanism
  • Simple, clear writing
  • The ability to identify a story
  • Removal of personal and societal bias
  • Being connected to your environment (in this case the sector you are writing about)
  • Devour as much good writing as you can
  • Just start writing
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Ankita Shreeram

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Alumni Interview with Ankita Shreeram, Assistant Producer at CNBC Awaaz

Posted on 13 February 2013 by BMMBoxer

Introduction


Ankita Shreeram

Ankita Shreeram


My Name is: Ankita Shreeram
BMM College
: K.C. College
BMM Specialisation: Journalism (Batch of 2010)
Currently Working at: CNBC Awaaz

Ankita’s Take
Does being a BMMite give you an edge over others in the field of media?
Yes, it does because in all probability you already have quite a few media internships under your belt. In addition, projects that involve practical work such as designing magazines and advertisements lend you at least a beginner’s level proficiency in software used in the media industry.

Do the subjects in BMM help you know the reality of the job? Is there any place for theory in the creative world?
Most of the subjects in the first couple of years are intended towards building a theoretic foundation and they don’t help further your knowledge of the professional world that much. But the subjects in the third year definitely do, as they are better oriented towards your area of specialisation. There is always place for theory as they are references you dip into.

BMM or BMM from a particular college? Does it make a difference?

BMM from a particular college, I’d say. Jai Hind, K.C. and Xavier’s share most of the faculty and they tend to be the best in the field. Other colleges like SIES, Wilson and Sophia College also offer good professors and courses.

Internships during colleges – are they relevant in the long run?
Internships are possibly the most relevant aspect of the BMM course. Of course, they need to be executed with integrity, towards an intention to learn and build contacts rather than just attain a certificate at the end of it all. Internships can fructify into job offers many a times and the experience is certainly invaluable.

Work Experience or Higher Studies? What’s your pick? Why?
Media is not an education-intensive field. Good media professionals are carved out of rigorous on-field experience rather than perfect grades in their exams. That said, a post-graduation is essential for better compensation in the long run. I would only recommend a year-long course in an institute that offers good exposure to industry professionals and an impressive placement record. Alternatively, the same pinnacle of success and monetary compensation can be reached with work experience alone if the right job shifts are made at strategic points in one’s career.

Tips for BMMBoxers
BMM is… a practical course full of variety and scope for experimentation.
Your favourite subjects in BMM: Organizational behaviour, Indian regional journalism, Creative writing, Journalism and public opinion, Reporting, Editing

5 Must-Follow Tips for BMMites:

  1. Don’t rely on the classroom alone for knowledge and learning
  2. Be outgoing, grab opportunities, and speak to as many people as you can
  3. Focus on letting your creative juices inspire your projects and don’t worry about grades
  4. Stay updated with what’s happening around you and do read a couple of newspapers daily
  5. Ask as many questions as you can. This is a course designed for inquiry and challenge, not blind acceptance of outdated facts


Current BMM students can connect with you on:

Twitter @AnkitaShreeram
http://ankitashreeram.blogspot.com

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Jerry Maguire

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Professional Talk with Ryan Pereira, Celebrity Manager

Posted on 01 February 2013 by BMMBoxer

Ryan Pereira

Ryan Pereira

Name:  Ryan Pereira

Company: Bling Global Entertainment Pvt. Ltd.

Designation: Celebrity Manager/Agent

Q. Tell us something about the field of Celebrity Management:

A. Celebrity Management is one of the fastest growing industries in the mass media sector  – be it films, modelling, sports or even talent. Celebrity management has become an inseparable part of our society with MNC’s and even small business entrepreneurs rushing to sign celebrities/talent to endorse their brand/campaign so as to lure the masses towards their brand/entity.

Q. What does Celebrity Management entail?

A. Celebrity management involves managing a celebrity’s endorsements contracts, movie contracts, brand tie ups, appearances and any commerce related activity that could help in financial gains as well as help him/her build a brand image that could help them connect with their audiences.

Q. What are the skills required to be a responsible/good celebrity manager?

A. The skills mainly required to be a good celebrity manager are as follows:

  • Presence of Mind
  • Being street smart
  • Integrity
  • Good communication skills
  • NO EGO
  • Good temperament
  • Crisis management skills

Q. What is a routine day like in the life of a celebrity manager?

A. The routine of a celebrity manager would vary from day to day. On some days you’d be at your desk from 10 am to 6 pm and on other days it could stretch from 10 am to 6 pm in the office and from 6pm  to perhaps 12 am on the set of a shoot/appearance. The schedule of a celebrity manager is not fixed, but you do get the weekends off. However, in case there is a shoot or an appearance the celebrity is expected to be present at, the manager has to follow suit and accompany the celebrity for the same.

Q. How can a fresher land a job in a celebrity management agency?

A. Any fresher could drop in his/her CV at any of the Celebrity Management agencies at any given point of time. However the month of March is ideal to do so as many agencies undergo a change in personnel with many moving out due to better pay offers from competitive agencies.

Q. The top 3 celebrity management agencies in the country, according to you, are:

  • BLING Global Entertainment Pvt. Ltd.
  • KWAN Entertainment Pvt. Ltd.
  • MATRIX Entertainment Pvt. Ltd.

Jerry Maguire

Jerry Maguire

Q. Five tips you’d like to share with BMM students aspiring to be celebrity managers:

1         Hone patience. It’s a virtue and you will inevitably need it in an industry that requires you to deal with ego’s the size of King Kong.

2         Being a go getter is very important in this industry. How to pitch your celebrity, when to pitch them, who to pitch them to, are important questions that need to be answered by a celebrity manager.

3         Strike a deal when the iron is hot. Don’t sit back thinking brands will call you inquiring after the celebrity you manage. Make the world know you’re managing a celebrity. Pitches need to be made almost every day for your celebrity to maximise their business propositions. Remember money is all that rules their world and like Rod Tidwell (played by Cuba Gooding Jr. in Jerry Maguire) tells his friend/agent Jerry Maguire (played by Tom Cruise) “SHOW ME THE MONEY!” is the motto you must live by.

4         Knowledge of the entertainment/sports/talent industry is essential. The knowledge that you’ll have will bring wealth to your clients. Period!

5         WATCH JERRY MAGUIRE

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Alumni Talk with Suhrid Pawar, Sr. Copywriter at Saatchi & Saatchi Focus

Posted on 11 January 2013 by Disha Shah


Introduction

My Name is: Suhrid Pawar
BMM College: SIES College, Sion
BMM Specialisation: Advertising (Batch of 2007)
Currently Working at: Senior Copywriter at Saatchi & Saatchi Focus

Suhrid’s Take
Does being a BMMite give you an edge over others?
Yes it does. Only if you are absolutely clear about what you want to do in life. Just a BMM qualification will not make you a media mogul overnight. The degree definitely gives you an edge as it exposes the workings of media in conjunction with society and consumers. The course opens up your mind to questioning, re-imagining, and demystifying the entire media industry and finding your own space in between all the chaos.

Do the subjects in BMM help you know the reality of the job? Is there any place for theory in the creative world?
The subjects give you an overall idea about how the industry runs. Realities have to be experienced on your own by doing internships, interacting with people from the industry, reading blogs and scouring media sites for trends and predictions. Theory is no doubt important. It makes one’s base firmer and allows one to be well-informed and open to change.

BMM or BMM from a particular college? Does it make a difference?
Makes a difference based upon the faculty. This is the biggest problem with the course as of now. The course is such that it needs people from the industry to come and share knowledge, which is difficult given the timings and commitments of professionals. Also, the right mindset towards running the course helps a lot. Almost every college in the city has BMM but not all of them are equipped with the right faculty or facilities, which is a shame.

Internships during colleges – are they relevant in the long run?
Yes they are. An internship gives you the chance to interact with professionals, get a taste of the life in media and also helps you to build contacts.

Career Queries
Work Experience or Higher Studies? What’s your pick? Why?
I would suggest a couple of years of work experience and then going for higher studies. If you want to go in for design or any specific line of the media, then a Masters helps. Otherwise, work is the best university.

How did you start your career?

I was part of a freelance ad agency started with my colleagues in BMM. We worked really hard during the second and third year, but had to discontinue as most of us left for further studies, including me. I wanted to pursue a Masters for which I went to British Council, met consultants and finally decided to do an MA in Communication Design from Kingston University.

Were you clear about which field you wanted to get into right from the beginning?
I was clear I wanted to get into advertising, Copywriting more specifically as I had done a Diploma in Applied Arts before the BMM course. This gave me clarity about my professional aspirations.

Any particular incident that helped you decide on your career option?
My decision to join the Diploma came after a disastrous HSC result. I failed in Maths and subsequently took an aptitude test, the results of which stated that I wasted two years in Science, and anything related to Arts would be really good for me. That was the turning point in my life

Tips for BMMBoxers:

  • Don’t fall into the trap of drugs, smoking and drinking and believing that all that is required for getting great ideas
  • Look everywhere around you for inspiration
  • Don’t expect the college to do things for you
  • Ask questions about everything. Debate. Read anything and everything
  • Stay on top of trends in the industry and get a good grip on English


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Alumni Interview: Akshada Bhalerao

Posted on 24 August 2012 by BMMBoxer

Introduction

My Name is: Akshada Bhalerao

Age: 23

BMM College: R. D. National College

BMM Specialisation: Journalism

Currently Working at: Disney Media Distribution and Syndication for The Walt Disney Company India (Which now includes the UTV group as well)

Akshada’s Take

Does being a BMMite give you an edge over others?

It does give you an edge because you’re exposed to most of the spheres of media and you begin to understand them. Working on many presentations gives you analytical powers and in tricky situations you do get last minute jugaad ideas as well.

Do the subjects in BMM help you know the reality of the job? Is there any place for theory in the creative world?

Well, it depends on what line of work you’re in. Theory is not emphasized as much in any line of work. It just helps you understand the very basics. Other stuff, you learn on the job.

BMM or BMM from a particular college? Does it make a difference?

Well, not college per say. But yes, exposure does matter. It’s very important to have good teachers, visiting faculty from the field, good projects and other activities.

Internships during colleges – are they relevant in the long run?

Internships are relevant, I feel. You know what you’re getting into later.

Career Queries

Work Ex or Higher Studies? What’s your pick? Why?

I’d suggest, start with work. It helps you sort many things in your head. A PG later doesn’t hurt.

How did you start your career?

I was confused after BMM. I had taken up Journalism only because I liked to write. But my strong liking has always been towards TV. Even in my internships, even though they had been with news channels, I was handling the production aspect for them. So I worked in production for reality shows.

Were you clear about which field you wanted to get into right from the beginning?

Like I said, I wasn’t clear if I wanted to be in hardcore journalism. Internships helped get a clear perspective.

Any particular incident that helped you decide on your career option?

Nothing in particular.

Tips for BMMBoxers

BMM is… A very good course if you want to be in Media

Your favourite subject in BMM: Literature

5 Tips for BMMites:

  • Stick to Deadlines
  • Respect time, yours and others
  • Take interest and try to explore things on your own
  • Stay updated about the industry you are interested in
  • Don’t take it too hard if your boss shouts at you!

Contact Me

Students can post queries in the comment section. I will respond as soon as I can.

Interview by Prasiddhi Munoth

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